The 2003 Iraq War began in the dark hours of March 19, 2003, with an aerial bombardment referred to as “shock and awe.” These massive, precision strikes presaged a massive ground invasion that included American, British, Australian, and Polish troops. After securing critical infrastructure, such as the oil fields in southern Iraq, armored columns drove deep into the heart of Iraq. The Iraqi units which chose to fight were quickly defeated, but most out up little resistance, and the coalition captured Baghdad on April 9, and the initial phase of the war was considered complete by May 1. With the Iraqi government toppled and its army disbanded, the coalition sought to draw down its forces, assigned a civilian administrator, and attempted to establish a new Iraqi government. Unrest in Iraq descended into revolt, resulting in a counter insurgency campaign lasting several years.


Last year marked the twentieth anniversary of the Iraq War, and the event came and went with little fanfare. The war received its share of criticism while it was underway, and in the aftermath, observers have been critical of the claimed reasons for the invasion, its conduct, its wider strategic impact, and of the cost in blood paid by the Iraqi people and the service members who fought there. Two of the bloodiest clashes of the Iraq War, the two battles of Fallujah, occurred in 2004, and it is my hope that these events can receive as little more attention and introspection than did the anniversary of the conflict in 2003. This conflict, and battles such as the two which occurred in Fallujah, affected many of the members of the Funker530 veteran community, and have shaped our military institutions and our strategic fortunes in the years since. This video, and others which will follow, will provide context to future discussions of the events of 2003 and 2004.


About the Author

Author's Photo

Cam

Cam served as an infantry officer in the Marine Corps, deploying to the Horn of Africa and participating in combat operations in Iraq. He currently works in the maritime industry and in the defense sector as an instructor of combined arms planning and operations. An avid sailor, Cam founded and directs Triumph Sailing, a nonprofit that supports veterans and first responders through adventure and fellowship on the water. Triumph Sailing just completed its big yearly event, an offshore race in the Gulf of Mexico with an all veteran crew. You can support the mission and next year's sailing season at Tri-Sail.Org.

Published 4 months ago

The 2003 Iraq War began in the dark hours of March 19, 2003, with an aerial bombardment referred to as “shock and awe.” These massive, precision strikes presaged a massive ground invasion that included American, British, Australian, and Polish troops. After securing critical infrastructure, such as the oil fields in southern Iraq, armored columns drove deep into the heart of Iraq. The Iraqi units which chose to fight were quickly defeated, but most out up little resistance, and the coalition captured Baghdad on April 9, and the initial phase of the war was considered complete by May 1. With the Iraqi government toppled and its army disbanded, the coalition sought to draw down its forces, assigned a civilian administrator, and attempted to establish a new Iraqi government. Unrest in Iraq descended into revolt, resulting in a counter insurgency campaign lasting several years.


Last year marked the twentieth anniversary of the Iraq War, and the event came and went with little fanfare. The war received its share of criticism while it was underway, and in the aftermath, observers have been critical of the claimed reasons for the invasion, its conduct, its wider strategic impact, and of the cost in blood paid by the Iraqi people and the service members who fought there. Two of the bloodiest clashes of the Iraq War, the two battles of Fallujah, occurred in 2004, and it is my hope that these events can receive as little more attention and introspection than did the anniversary of the conflict in 2003. This conflict, and battles such as the two which occurred in Fallujah, affected many of the members of the Funker530 veteran community, and have shaped our military institutions and our strategic fortunes in the years since. This video, and others which will follow, will provide context to future discussions of the events of 2003 and 2004.


About the Author

Author's Photo

Cam

Cam served as an infantry officer in the Marine Corps, deploying to the Horn of Africa and participating in combat operations in Iraq. He currently works in the maritime industry and in the defense sector as an instructor of combined arms planning and operations. An avid sailor, Cam founded and directs Triumph Sailing, a nonprofit that supports veterans and first responders through adventure and fellowship on the water. Triumph Sailing just completed its big yearly event, an offshore race in the Gulf of Mexico with an all veteran crew. You can support the mission and next year's sailing season at Tri-Sail.Org.

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