Ukrainian Drone Crew Torches Disabled Russian BMP

Drone video released by a Ukrainian drone crew tasked with destroying disabled Russian armor shows a successful direct hit against an open BMP hatch.


By now, this tactic is becoming common place. While there are many super pro-Ukrainian individuals who like to imagine the Russians are still inside of the armor when these drone dropped munitions land in the open hatch, it's now become abundantly clear that this is a regular occurrence. Ukrainian troops or artillery disable the armor, and then drone crews come in after the fact to drop munitions inside of the hatches the Russians left open.


These operations are being carried out to fully destroy the vehicles and prevent the Russians from recovering and repairing the armor at a later date. A vehicle that is a mobility kill is easy enough to fix, but once you've set the miles of wiring on the inside of the armor on fire, it becomes far more difficult and costly to conduct the repair.


About the Author

Author's Photo

Josh Brooks

Josh is an American writer and former USMC machine gunner with eight years of experience in ground combat arms throughout the GWOT. He is currently based in Texas and specializes in combat footage analysis and digital marketing.Follow Josh at OfficialJoshBrooks.com

Published 3 months ago

Drone video released by a Ukrainian drone crew tasked with destroying disabled Russian armor shows a successful direct hit against an open BMP hatch.


By now, this tactic is becoming common place. While there are many super pro-Ukrainian individuals who like to imagine the Russians are still inside of the armor when these drone dropped munitions land in the open hatch, it's now become abundantly clear that this is a regular occurrence. Ukrainian troops or artillery disable the armor, and then drone crews come in after the fact to drop munitions inside of the hatches the Russians left open.


These operations are being carried out to fully destroy the vehicles and prevent the Russians from recovering and repairing the armor at a later date. A vehicle that is a mobility kill is easy enough to fix, but once you've set the miles of wiring on the inside of the armor on fire, it becomes far more difficult and costly to conduct the repair.


About the Author

Author's Photo

Josh Brooks

Josh is an American writer and former USMC machine gunner with eight years of experience in ground combat arms throughout the GWOT. He is currently based in Texas and specializes in combat footage analysis and digital marketing.Follow Josh at OfficialJoshBrooks.com

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