Armenian Tor System Destroyed in Khankendi

Footage that was allegedly recorded today shows a strike against an Armenian Tor Air Defense system that is located near Khankendi. While we cannot confirm anything at this time, the amount of footage coming out of the region today indicates that we may be seeing the Third Nagorno-Karabakh War in the very near future.


For those of you who are out of the loop, The Nagorno-Karabakh War was a conflict between Armenia and Azerbaijan over the Nagorno-Karabakh region in the South Caucasus. It began in the late 1980s due to ethnic and territorial disputes. Armenia, with a majority Armenian population, sought to gain control of Nagorno-Karabakh, an enclave within Azerbaijan's borders. The war erupted in 1988, escalating into a full-scale armed conflict in 1992.


Both sides have engaged in intense fighting, resulting in significant casualties and displacements of people. A ceasefire was brokered in 1994, but tensions persisted until a boiling point in September of 2020, when hostilities flared up again. This conflict, which was mostly unseen by most of the world due to the COVID-19 Pandemic, lead to a six-week war that ended with a Russian-brokered ceasefire in November of 2020. Azerbaijan made significant territorial gains during this period, regaining control over parts of Nagorno-Karabakh and surrounding areas.


The conflict's root causes include historical grievances, competing nationalist aspirations, and the collapse of the Soviet Union. The war resulted in a fragile peace, with Russian peacekeepers deployed in the region. The status of Nagorno-Karabakh remains unresolved. Obviously, with the conflict in Ukraine taking much, if not all of Russia's resources from the region, peace keeping operations have been limited to non-existent. This has lead to a continuation of the conflict that has seen a few sparks over the past year and a half.


Today those sparks look like they may ignite a third bloody war between the Azeri and Armenian people.


About the Author

Author's Photo

Josh Brooks

Josh is an American writer and former USMC machine gunner with eight years of experience in ground combat arms throughout the GWOT. He is currently based in Texas and specializes in combat footage analysis and digital marketing.Follow Josh at OfficialJoshBrooks.com

Published 8 months ago

Footage that was allegedly recorded today shows a strike against an Armenian Tor Air Defense system that is located near Khankendi. While we cannot confirm anything at this time, the amount of footage coming out of the region today indicates that we may be seeing the Third Nagorno-Karabakh War in the very near future.


For those of you who are out of the loop, The Nagorno-Karabakh War was a conflict between Armenia and Azerbaijan over the Nagorno-Karabakh region in the South Caucasus. It began in the late 1980s due to ethnic and territorial disputes. Armenia, with a majority Armenian population, sought to gain control of Nagorno-Karabakh, an enclave within Azerbaijan's borders. The war erupted in 1988, escalating into a full-scale armed conflict in 1992.


Both sides have engaged in intense fighting, resulting in significant casualties and displacements of people. A ceasefire was brokered in 1994, but tensions persisted until a boiling point in September of 2020, when hostilities flared up again. This conflict, which was mostly unseen by most of the world due to the COVID-19 Pandemic, lead to a six-week war that ended with a Russian-brokered ceasefire in November of 2020. Azerbaijan made significant territorial gains during this period, regaining control over parts of Nagorno-Karabakh and surrounding areas.


The conflict's root causes include historical grievances, competing nationalist aspirations, and the collapse of the Soviet Union. The war resulted in a fragile peace, with Russian peacekeepers deployed in the region. The status of Nagorno-Karabakh remains unresolved. Obviously, with the conflict in Ukraine taking much, if not all of Russia's resources from the region, peace keeping operations have been limited to non-existent. This has lead to a continuation of the conflict that has seen a few sparks over the past year and a half.


Today those sparks look like they may ignite a third bloody war between the Azeri and Armenian people.


About the Author

Author's Photo

Josh Brooks

Josh is an American writer and former USMC machine gunner with eight years of experience in ground combat arms throughout the GWOT. He is currently based in Texas and specializes in combat footage analysis and digital marketing.Follow Josh at OfficialJoshBrooks.com

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