Thank God For Backup: Unprepared Desk Officer Loses Fight, Saved by Janitors

This compilation of bodycam and security footage depicts a desk officer in a verbal altercation with an emotionally distressed person, which escalates to physical violence. The EDP attempts to take the officer's pistol before he is assisted by others.


Disclaimer: I want to begin by stating I chose to bring you this video for educational purposes, not to shame the involved officer. However, just after 1: Coming home alive, and 2: not violating anyone's rights, item number 3 on a cop's to-do list should include not becoming a training video. For several reasons, this officer fails in that. Let's get into it:


The video begins with the EDP (who, at this point hs not committed a crime and is therefore not a suspect) demanding to speak to the police Chief. The officer at first demurs, saying that seeing the Chief requires an appointment. However, as the EDP (later identified as Keishaun Sims) remains recalcitrant, the officer makes the crucial mistake at 02:17 that sets everything else in motion: he calls Sims "mental." Sims replies by calling the officer "retarded," at which point the officer gets up and leaves the secure area to deal with Sims.


As the officer closes into contact with Sims, it's clear that being called "mental" has set Sims off. He demands that the officer say it again, then that he call someone. The officer then says that Sims has to leave- this sets up an impasse. "Make me leave," Sims says, which is something the officer cannot do. Getting physical to kick him out isn't an option.The officer is silent for four seconds at 03:00 as this dawns on him. At 03:13, he tries to defend calling Sims "mental" by restating that Sims called him "retarded"- ignoring the fact that Sims did so after the officer opened the door to grade school name-calling. Furthermore, when dared to, the officer takes the bait and calls him "mental' again at 03:14, knowing it's going to antagonize Sims. Sure enough, round one starts.


Sims immediately puts the officer on his back at 03:27. "Ain't nobody mental, bro." He makes it clear that this officer's verbal and actual judo both need work. Sims lets the officer get up at 03:40. Round two: The officer charges him, and then the feed cuts to a nearby security camera, which shows the officer getting starched at 03:47. Sims lets him up again, and, eschewing any thoughts of non-lethal options or backup, the officer draws his pistol at 03:56. I am not a lawyer, but I'm not confident that getting baited into a fight after calling someone mental, losing that fight, being let up, and rocked in the mouth again constitutes an escalation straight to deadly force. It turns out that it doesn't matter, because Sims spins him around and takes him down, choking the officer and attempting to take his weapon before help arrives at 04:02.


Backup, in this case apparently janitorial services, slams Sims into the wall and pins him as a sergeant makes it down the stairs. The sergeant informs Sims that charges will be pressed as he arrests him. At 05:20, as he is led away, Sims tells the officer "I'll see you again."


The officer, who just lost a fight to a man in Crocs and got choked out after drawing his weapon in response to it, has the audacity to reply "I hope so." This would be unprofessional even if the janitor crew hadn't just saved his ass.


Sims was booked on aggravated robbery (presumably for trying to take the gun pointed at him) and 2 counts of assault on an officer, along with misdemeanor counts of obstructing business and resisting arrest. The police department is reportedly "mulling over" wether they need more de-escalation training. I think they might.

About the Author

Author's Photo

Cole Simms

Cole Simms is an Air Guardsman, NASA enthusiast, police officer, and security contractor with particular experience in austere environments. Outside of work, he volunteers as a Stop The Bleed instructor for area schools. He holds a Bachelor's Degree in Homeland Security and Emergency Management, and blends his knowledge and experience to write analysis for Funker530.


Need a tried-and-tested fixed blade that's trusted by police, military and protective service users all over the world? Cole recommends Ironside Edge Works for your tactical or EDC blade needs.

Published 5 months ago

This compilation of bodycam and security footage depicts a desk officer in a verbal altercation with an emotionally distressed person, which escalates to physical violence. The EDP attempts to take the officer's pistol before he is assisted by others.


Disclaimer: I want to begin by stating I chose to bring you this video for educational purposes, not to shame the involved officer. However, just after 1: Coming home alive, and 2: not violating anyone's rights, item number 3 on a cop's to-do list should include not becoming a training video. For several reasons, this officer fails in that. Let's get into it:


The video begins with the EDP (who, at this point hs not committed a crime and is therefore not a suspect) demanding to speak to the police Chief. The officer at first demurs, saying that seeing the Chief requires an appointment. However, as the EDP (later identified as Keishaun Sims) remains recalcitrant, the officer makes the crucial mistake at 02:17 that sets everything else in motion: he calls Sims "mental." Sims replies by calling the officer "retarded," at which point the officer gets up and leaves the secure area to deal with Sims.


As the officer closes into contact with Sims, it's clear that being called "mental" has set Sims off. He demands that the officer say it again, then that he call someone. The officer then says that Sims has to leave- this sets up an impasse. "Make me leave," Sims says, which is something the officer cannot do. Getting physical to kick him out isn't an option.The officer is silent for four seconds at 03:00 as this dawns on him. At 03:13, he tries to defend calling Sims "mental" by restating that Sims called him "retarded"- ignoring the fact that Sims did so after the officer opened the door to grade school name-calling. Furthermore, when dared to, the officer takes the bait and calls him "mental' again at 03:14, knowing it's going to antagonize Sims. Sure enough, round one starts.


Sims immediately puts the officer on his back at 03:27. "Ain't nobody mental, bro." He makes it clear that this officer's verbal and actual judo both need work. Sims lets the officer get up at 03:40. Round two: The officer charges him, and then the feed cuts to a nearby security camera, which shows the officer getting starched at 03:47. Sims lets him up again, and, eschewing any thoughts of non-lethal options or backup, the officer draws his pistol at 03:56. I am not a lawyer, but I'm not confident that getting baited into a fight after calling someone mental, losing that fight, being let up, and rocked in the mouth again constitutes an escalation straight to deadly force. It turns out that it doesn't matter, because Sims spins him around and takes him down, choking the officer and attempting to take his weapon before help arrives at 04:02.


Backup, in this case apparently janitorial services, slams Sims into the wall and pins him as a sergeant makes it down the stairs. The sergeant informs Sims that charges will be pressed as he arrests him. At 05:20, as he is led away, Sims tells the officer "I'll see you again."


The officer, who just lost a fight to a man in Crocs and got choked out after drawing his weapon in response to it, has the audacity to reply "I hope so." This would be unprofessional even if the janitor crew hadn't just saved his ass.


Sims was booked on aggravated robbery (presumably for trying to take the gun pointed at him) and 2 counts of assault on an officer, along with misdemeanor counts of obstructing business and resisting arrest. The police department is reportedly "mulling over" wether they need more de-escalation training. I think they might.

About the Author

Author's Photo

Cole Simms

Cole Simms is an Air Guardsman, NASA enthusiast, police officer, and security contractor with particular experience in austere environments. Outside of work, he volunteers as a Stop The Bleed instructor for area schools. He holds a Bachelor's Degree in Homeland Security and Emergency Management, and blends his knowledge and experience to write analysis for Funker530.


Need a tried-and-tested fixed blade that's trusted by police, military and protective service users all over the world? Cole recommends Ironside Edge Works for your tactical or EDC blade needs.

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