Problem: If your video player doesn't load within 5 seconds, your ad blocker or browser settings have hidden it or it's still loading due to a slow connection.

Solution: Whitelist Funker530.com and/or disable enhanced tracking protection in FireFox by clicking the shield icon next to the URL bar. Duck Duck Go also needs to have our site whitelisted.

Locals Remove Road Signs to Confuse the Russians

Published Feb. 26, 2022

Footage obtained by Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty shows Ukrainian locals removing road signs on a major route in order to confuse the Russians who may be operating with outdated or no maps.


This is passive aggressive resistance, but it's pretty good none the less. From what we've seen of the Russians so far in this invasion, their troops are underequipped, undersupplied, and many of them are operating off of what appears to be the seat of their pants. In a few situations, we've seen footage of lost Russians asking locals for directions, which leads me to believe that not every Russian vehicle has access to any sort of blue force tracking software, and many are probably operating without maps. Don't worry, I'm sure I'll get an angry email from one of our Russian viewers any second telling me how wrong I am for forming an opinion based on my observations.


If that is the case, there's a strong likelihood that the Russians are heavily relying on Ukrainian road signs to get them from point a to point b when they are not moving a large column with one of their officers controlling a map. There's also a small chance, and this is an assumption, that the Russian front-line troops are working off of outdated maps.


Most likely, the removal of these road signs will have very little impact on a macro scale. At the micro level however this could cause chaos as Russian troops without maps get lost from their parent convoys.


The only way this video could be better is if they turned the sign around looney toons style and sent the Russians back to Belarus.


josh brooks

Published Feb. 26, 2022

Footage obtained by Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty shows Ukrainian locals removing road signs on a major route in order to confuse the Russians who may be operating with outdated or no maps.


This is passive aggressive resistance, but it's pretty good none the less. From what we've seen of the Russians so far in this invasion, their troops are underequipped, undersupplied, and many of them are operating off of what appears to be the seat of their pants. In a few situations, we've seen footage of lost Russians asking locals for directions, which leads me to believe that not every Russian vehicle has access to any sort of blue force tracking software, and many are probably operating without maps. Don't worry, I'm sure I'll get an angry email from one of our Russian viewers any second telling me how wrong I am for forming an opinion based on my observations.


If that is the case, there's a strong likelihood that the Russians are heavily relying on Ukrainian road signs to get them from point a to point b when they are not moving a large column with one of their officers controlling a map. There's also a small chance, and this is an assumption, that the Russian front-line troops are working off of outdated maps.


Most likely, the removal of these road signs will have very little impact on a macro scale. At the micro level however this could cause chaos as Russian troops without maps get lost from their parent convoys.


The only way this video could be better is if they turned the sign around looney toons style and sent the Russians back to Belarus.


josh brooks

   Return Home

This video has been flagged by our users, and contains mature content. Log in or create an account to verify that you are 18+

My Subscriptions

Search Funker530